What's coming from Asia?

The Asia-Pacific region, covering over 60 countries, is home to 17 of the 36 global biodiversity hotspots. Sadly, this continent is also an epicentre of the global wildlife trade.

In live animal markets wild animals are sold as exotic pets and for meat or traditional medicines.

Every step of the way, these animals are treated horrifically. The conditions where they are captured, farmed, and sold are breeding grounds for zoonotic diseases that affect millions of humans every year.

From the transcontinental pangolin trade, to Indonesian wildlife markets and the bear bile industry across Asia, the wildlife trade in Asia is more extensive, cruel and dangerous than you might think.

Otters from Southeast Asia

In recent years, there has been a disturbing increase in the popularity of people wanting otters as pets. Because of this demand, more otters are being ripped from their wild homes and illegally traded. “We went undercover to document the shocking practices this trade uses to satisfy the growing demand for otters to be kept as pets.” said Liam Slattery, World Animal Protection’s Head of Investigations.

In addition to increasing the risk of zoonotic disease, you should be alarmed to learn that this practice is putting the very future of some otter species at risk.  Wild populations of Asian small-clawed and smooth-coated otters have declined by more than 30% in the last 30 years.

This illegal practice is much more widespread and crueler than you may think. World Animal Protection investigators have discovered that hunters who seek out otter cubs typically kill their protective parents in the process. In other cases, breeders tear weeks-old cubs from their parents and bottle feed them to make them 'tame'.

There is no right way to capture and trade otters, or any wildlife. We must stop the global wildlife trade now.

There is a growing illegal trade of wild Asian otters being fuelled by the rise of the “otter craze” in Indonesia and Japan: Otter cafes and the desire for images of pet otters on social media are driving wild otters are being hunted and trafficked out of existence to satisfy growing international demand. 

Bear bile from across Asia

At this very moment, at least 24,000 bears are being caged and farmed for their bile across Asia - in China, Vietnam, Myanmar, Lao PDR and South Korea.

Tragically, these bears are forced to live and suffer in devastating conditions so that their bile can be extracted for traditional medicine products.

This crue, inhumane practice must be stopped. It puts both Asian bear and human populations at risk. Many of the conditions created by this practice are ripe for zoonotic disease transmission. Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that can spread from animals to humans.  Collectively, they are responsible for over 2 billion cases of human illness and over 2 million human deaths each year.

Worse than you think

There is no humane way to harvest bear bile. Their bile is extracted through a process that leads to immeasurable suffering, or they are killed for their gallbladder.  Bears are kept in entirely unsuitable and poor captive conditions. 

Bile is harvested from bears and then traded around the world. In China, the cruel bear farming industry is actually legal. But just because it is legal, it doesn't mean it is humane or safe.

The demand this industry stimulates risks encouraging the illegal trade and poaching of bears in countries outside of China to meet demand. 

We must act now to stop the global wildlife trade. It is cruel to bears, and it puts human lives at risk.

Pangolins

As a species, pangolins have gained attention in recent years as an icon of the illegal, global wildlife trade.

In fact, pangolins are often reported to be the world’s most heavily trafficked mammal.

Several recent investigations pose the question: did the consumer demand for pangolins spark our current global health crisis?

Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
– Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • 大量动物被关在卫生条件恶劣的环境中,在狭小的笼子中,它们忍受着巨大压力和痛苦。 恶劣的卫生条件加上与人类的直接接触为病毒的滋生和传播创造了温床。
    – “野生动物并非宠物”项目全球负责人 Cassandra Koenen
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • “Investigaciones han mostrado que los pangolines podrían haber transmitido el COVID-19 a los humanos, pero nadie lo sabe con certeza. Otros mamíferos como los murciélagos, los camellos y las civetas tienen la capacidad de albergar y transmitir coronavirus como el COVID-19”.
    – Gilbert Sape, Director global de campaña: Silvestres. No Medicina.
  • “Los mercados de medicina tradicional de Benín son como escenas de una película de terror. Vimos las cabezas de monos, serpientes, tortugas, civetas, perros, gatos y muchos animales más. Miles de animales, entre cientos de especies, están sobre mesas como en una macabra exhibición. El director Will Foster-Grundy y yo hemos cubierto historias sobre el conflicto humano animal por años, sin embargo, estos mercados siguen siendo impactantes para el sistema”.
    – Aaron Gekoski, fotoperiodista ambiental galardonado.
  • “Los jaguares ya enfrentan desafíos por la destrucción de su hábitat y el conflicto con los humanos por su territorio. Ahora son asesinados cruelmente o heridos y abandonados para morir. Existen reportes de que los cazadores han disparado hasta siete veces contra un jaguar, provocándole una muerte prolongada y dolorosa. Con la apertura del hábitat de los jaguares, se incrementan los encuentros entre los animales y los mineros, los agricultores y los madereros, quienes les disparan de manera oportunista”.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Asesor de Investigaciones
  • “Existe una gran cantidad de animales que son mantenidos en condiciones pobres de higiene, confinados en pequeñas jaulas, donde probablemente sus sistemas inmunes se debilitan a causa del estrés. La falta de higiene, combinada con el contacto directo con humanos, crea condiciones ideales para el desarrollo y la propagación de virus”.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Directora global de campañas de vida silvestre: Silvestres. No mascotas.
  • 科学研究表明,穿山甲、蝙蝠、果子狸等野生动物是一些人兽共患病病毒的携带者。
    –   
  • 贝宁的传统医药市场如同野生动物的地狱,这里有猴子、蛇、乌龟、麝香猫、犬、猫等很多动物的头部,数百种、成千上万只动物,被摆放在桌子上售卖,令人毛骨悚然。我和Will Foster-Grundy导演多年来一直在报道人兽冲突议题,但这个市场对于我们来说仍是一个巨大冲击。
    – 环境摄影记者 Aaron Gekoski
  • 美洲豹面临着栖息地破坏以及人兽冲突的挑战。现在它们被猎杀。曾报道过一只美洲豹被猎人射击了七次,导致其漫长而痛苦地死亡。 随着美洲豹栖息地的开发,它们与矿工、农民和伐木工的接触也逐渐增加,而这些人会趁机射杀它们。
    – 调查顾问 Nicholas Bruschi
  • Des recherches ont démontré que les pangolins pourraient potentiellement avoir transmis la COVID-19 aux humains, mais personne n’en a la certitude. D’autres mammifères, comme les chauves-souris, les chameaux et les civettes sont capables d’être des hôtes et de transmettre des coronavirus comme la COVID-19.
    – Gilbert Sape, chef de la campagne de protection de la faune Faune, au lieu de médicament
  • Les marchés de médecine traditionnelle au Bénin ressemblaient à des scènes d’un film d’horreur. Nous avons vu des têtes de singes, de serpents, de tortues, de civettes, de chiens, de chats, et même plus; des milliers d’animaux et des centaines d’espèces étendus sur des tables dans des présentations macabres. Le réalisateur Will Foster-Grundy et moi avons longtemps couvert les conflits entre humains et animaux, et malgré cela, ces marchés ont provoqué chez nous un choc immense.
    – Aaron Gekoski, photojournaliste environnemental primé
  • Lorsque de grands nombres d’animaux sont maintenus dans de piètres conditions d’hygiène — les animaux sont entassés dans des cages, où ils sont susceptibles de fragiliser leur système immunitaire en raison du stress —, ce manque d’hygiène, combiné à un contact humain direct, crée un terrain fertile pour l’émergence et la propagation de virus.
    – Cassandra Koenen, chef de la campagne de protection de la faune Faune, au lieu de compagnon
  • Les jaguars sont déjà confrontés à la destruction de leur habitat et à des conflits avec les humains. Ils sont maintenant tués cruellement, ou blessés et laissés pour morts. Des rapports révèlent que des jaguars ont été tirés jusqu’à sept fois par des chasseurs, entraînant ainsi une mort prolongée et douloureuse. L’empiètement sur l’habitat des jaguars augmente également les rencontres entre les jaguars et des mineurs, des fermiers et des bûcherons, qui les prennent opportunément pour cible.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, conseiller aux enquêtes
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • "Pesquisas mostraram que os pangolins podem ter transmitido a COVID-19 para humanos, mas ninguém sabe ao certo. Outros mamíferos, como morcegos, camelos e civetas, são reservatórios ou fontes de infecção de patógenos como o coronavírus".
    – Gilbert Sape, Gerente Global de Vida Silvestre da Proteção Animal Mundial
  • "Os mercados de medicina tradicional são verdadeiros filmes de terror. Vimos cabeças de macacos, cobras, tartarugas, civetas, cães, gatos e muito mais; milhares de animais, de centenas de espécies, dispostos sobre as mesas como uma exposição macabra. Eu e o diretor Will Foster-Grundy cobrimos conflitos entre humanos e animais por anos, mas esses mercados ainda são um choque para o sistema."
    – Aaron Gekoski, Fotojornalista Ambiental Premiado
  • "As onças já enfrentam desafios com a destruição de seus habitats, além de conflitos frequentes com humanos. Elas são cruelmente caçadas e feridas, muitas vezes deixadas para morrer depois de mutiladas. Há relatos de onças sendo baleadas por até sete vezes pelos caçadores, encarando uma morte prolongada e extremamente dolorosa. Com a crescente exploração de seu habitat natural, aumentam-se os encontros entre esses animais e mineradores, agricultores e madeireiros – que atiram nelas de forma oportunista"
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigador.
  • "Com uma enorme quantidade de animais mantidos em condições precárias de higiene – a maioria amontoada em gaiolas apertadas, aumenta-se a probabilidade de enfraquecimento da imunidade devido ao estresse. Essa falta de higiene combinada ao contato direto com humanos é a condição ideal para que os vírus surjam e se espalhem."
    – Cassandra Koenen, Chefe Global da Campanha Animal Silvetsre Não É Pet da Proteção Animal Mundial
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski

A life in captivity is no life for an Elephant

Across the world, and throughout Asia, wild animals are being taken from the wild, or bred in captivity, to be used in the tourism entertainment industry. They will suffer at every stage of this inherently cruel process and throughout their lives in captivity.

Thailand has by far the highest numbers of elephants used in tourism. Tourism was originally an alternative income source for elephant owners who previously worked their elephants in logging camps. With growing tourist numbers and increasing profits, tourism is the primary employment for elephants – many of which were born after the logging ban in 1989 and made to work in the tourism industry ever since.

Our 2020 report “Elephants. Not Commodities” equates the value of an elephant to up to US$50,000. With such a price tag on the head of an endangered animal as a legal commodity, it raises serious conservation concerns and is a strong incentive for people to capture wild elephants or breed them for further profit-making into a captive environment that can never meet their needs.

Elephants are wild animals – not entertainment commodities. They need our protection to stay in the wild where they belong. 

 

Wildlife markets are a hotbed for disease

Photos from an Indonesian market show the heartbreaking reality of the exotic pet trade, where bats, otters, exotic birds and other animals are caged and sold alongside groceries.

Animals that are sold at markets like this one have suffered horrendous conditions before they even get there.

With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
– Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • 大量动物被关在卫生条件恶劣的环境中,在狭小的笼子中,它们忍受着巨大压力和痛苦。 恶劣的卫生条件加上与人类的直接接触为病毒的滋生和传播创造了温床。
    – “野生动物并非宠物”项目全球负责人 Cassandra Koenen
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • “Investigaciones han mostrado que los pangolines podrían haber transmitido el COVID-19 a los humanos, pero nadie lo sabe con certeza. Otros mamíferos como los murciélagos, los camellos y las civetas tienen la capacidad de albergar y transmitir coronavirus como el COVID-19”.
    – Gilbert Sape, Director global de campaña: Silvestres. No Medicina.
  • “Los mercados de medicina tradicional de Benín son como escenas de una película de terror. Vimos las cabezas de monos, serpientes, tortugas, civetas, perros, gatos y muchos animales más. Miles de animales, entre cientos de especies, están sobre mesas como en una macabra exhibición. El director Will Foster-Grundy y yo hemos cubierto historias sobre el conflicto humano animal por años, sin embargo, estos mercados siguen siendo impactantes para el sistema”.
    – Aaron Gekoski, fotoperiodista ambiental galardonado.
  • “Los jaguares ya enfrentan desafíos por la destrucción de su hábitat y el conflicto con los humanos por su territorio. Ahora son asesinados cruelmente o heridos y abandonados para morir. Existen reportes de que los cazadores han disparado hasta siete veces contra un jaguar, provocándole una muerte prolongada y dolorosa. Con la apertura del hábitat de los jaguares, se incrementan los encuentros entre los animales y los mineros, los agricultores y los madereros, quienes les disparan de manera oportunista”.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Asesor de Investigaciones
  • “Existe una gran cantidad de animales que son mantenidos en condiciones pobres de higiene, confinados en pequeñas jaulas, donde probablemente sus sistemas inmunes se debilitan a causa del estrés. La falta de higiene, combinada con el contacto directo con humanos, crea condiciones ideales para el desarrollo y la propagación de virus”.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Directora global de campañas de vida silvestre: Silvestres. No mascotas.
  • 科学研究表明,穿山甲、蝙蝠、果子狸等野生动物是一些人兽共患病病毒的携带者。
    –   
  • 贝宁的传统医药市场如同野生动物的地狱,这里有猴子、蛇、乌龟、麝香猫、犬、猫等很多动物的头部,数百种、成千上万只动物,被摆放在桌子上售卖,令人毛骨悚然。我和Will Foster-Grundy导演多年来一直在报道人兽冲突议题,但这个市场对于我们来说仍是一个巨大冲击。
    – 环境摄影记者 Aaron Gekoski
  • 美洲豹面临着栖息地破坏以及人兽冲突的挑战。现在它们被猎杀。曾报道过一只美洲豹被猎人射击了七次,导致其漫长而痛苦地死亡。 随着美洲豹栖息地的开发,它们与矿工、农民和伐木工的接触也逐渐增加,而这些人会趁机射杀它们。
    – 调查顾问 Nicholas Bruschi
  • Des recherches ont démontré que les pangolins pourraient potentiellement avoir transmis la COVID-19 aux humains, mais personne n’en a la certitude. D’autres mammifères, comme les chauves-souris, les chameaux et les civettes sont capables d’être des hôtes et de transmettre des coronavirus comme la COVID-19.
    – Gilbert Sape, chef de la campagne de protection de la faune Faune, au lieu de médicament
  • Les marchés de médecine traditionnelle au Bénin ressemblaient à des scènes d’un film d’horreur. Nous avons vu des têtes de singes, de serpents, de tortues, de civettes, de chiens, de chats, et même plus; des milliers d’animaux et des centaines d’espèces étendus sur des tables dans des présentations macabres. Le réalisateur Will Foster-Grundy et moi avons longtemps couvert les conflits entre humains et animaux, et malgré cela, ces marchés ont provoqué chez nous un choc immense.
    – Aaron Gekoski, photojournaliste environnemental primé
  • Lorsque de grands nombres d’animaux sont maintenus dans de piètres conditions d’hygiène — les animaux sont entassés dans des cages, où ils sont susceptibles de fragiliser leur système immunitaire en raison du stress —, ce manque d’hygiène, combiné à un contact humain direct, crée un terrain fertile pour l’émergence et la propagation de virus.
    – Cassandra Koenen, chef de la campagne de protection de la faune Faune, au lieu de compagnon
  • Les jaguars sont déjà confrontés à la destruction de leur habitat et à des conflits avec les humains. Ils sont maintenant tués cruellement, ou blessés et laissés pour morts. Des rapports révèlent que des jaguars ont été tirés jusqu’à sept fois par des chasseurs, entraînant ainsi une mort prolongée et douloureuse. L’empiètement sur l’habitat des jaguars augmente également les rencontres entre les jaguars et des mineurs, des fermiers et des bûcherons, qui les prennent opportunément pour cible.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, conseiller aux enquêtes
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • "Pesquisas mostraram que os pangolins podem ter transmitido a COVID-19 para humanos, mas ninguém sabe ao certo. Outros mamíferos, como morcegos, camelos e civetas, são reservatórios ou fontes de infecção de patógenos como o coronavírus".
    – Gilbert Sape, Gerente Global de Vida Silvestre da Proteção Animal Mundial
  • "Os mercados de medicina tradicional são verdadeiros filmes de terror. Vimos cabeças de macacos, cobras, tartarugas, civetas, cães, gatos e muito mais; milhares de animais, de centenas de espécies, dispostos sobre as mesas como uma exposição macabra. Eu e o diretor Will Foster-Grundy cobrimos conflitos entre humanos e animais por anos, mas esses mercados ainda são um choque para o sistema."
    – Aaron Gekoski, Fotojornalista Ambiental Premiado
  • "As onças já enfrentam desafios com a destruição de seus habitats, além de conflitos frequentes com humanos. Elas são cruelmente caçadas e feridas, muitas vezes deixadas para morrer depois de mutiladas. Há relatos de onças sendo baleadas por até sete vezes pelos caçadores, encarando uma morte prolongada e extremamente dolorosa. Com a crescente exploração de seu habitat natural, aumentam-se os encontros entre esses animais e mineradores, agricultores e madeireiros – que atiram nelas de forma oportunista"
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigador.
  • "Com uma enorme quantidade de animais mantidos em condições precárias de higiene – a maioria amontoada em gaiolas apertadas, aumenta-se a probabilidade de enfraquecimento da imunidade devido ao estresse. Essa falta de higiene combinada ao contato direto com humanos é a condição ideal para que os vírus surjam e se espalhem."
    – Cassandra Koenen, Chefe Global da Campanha Animal Silvetsre Não É Pet da Proteção Animal Mundial
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Jaguars already face the challenges of habitat destruction and human animal conflicts. They are now cruelly killed,or injured and left to die. There are reports of jaguars being shot up to seven times by hunters, leading to a protracted and painful death. With the jaguar's habitat being opened, this also increases encounters between jaguars and miners, farmers and loggers, who shoot them opportunistically.
    – Nicholas Bruschi, Investigations Advisor
  • With large numbers of animals kept in poor hygiene conditions the animals are kept in cramped cages, where they will eventually develop weakened immunities due to stress. This lack of hygiene combined with direct human contact creates a hot bed for viruses to mutate and develop.
    – Cassandra Koenen, Global Head of Wildlife Campaigns, Wildlife Not Pets
  • Research has shown that pangolins could potentially have spread COVID-19 to humans, but nobody knows for certain. Other mammals such as bats, camels and civets are capable or hosting and transmitting coronaviruses such as COVID-19
    – Gilbert Sape, Global Head of Wildlife Campaign, Bears and Traditional Medicine
  • The traditional medicine markets in Benin were like scenes from a horror movie. We saw the heads of monkeys, snakes, turtles, civets, dogs, cats, and more; thousands of animals, across hundreds of species laid out on tables in macabre displays. Director Will Foster-Grundy and I have covered stories of human-animal conflict for years, yet the markets were still a shock to the system.
    – Award Winning Environmental Photojournalist Aaron Gekoski

You have the power to fix this

You now know that the global wildlife trade is much bigger and much more dangerous than you thought it was. You know that for many species remaining wild populations are being driven to extinction. You know that millions of animals are suffering every single day. You know that the conditions these animals are forced to endure are rife for disease. You know that diseases can be transferred between wildlife and humans. And as of this year, you know how truly devastating a new disease can be when it spreads through every community on the planet.

You can help stop the next pandemic by taking action today. Please sign the petition now so we can deliver it to the G20 summit in Saudi Arabia this November. Sign it and tell the world's leaders that you demand an end to the global wildlife trade before it's too late.